"We all know that nothing matters more to student achievement than teacher quality. And in the spirit of collaboration, critical to quality education and great teaching, the IBM Foundation collaborated with education policy leaders from across the country to develop this innovative online resource.”

IBM's Free Math Tool for Teachers

Elementary school teachers in Massachusetts and across the United States are now able to access a new, free online tool, designed by and for teachers, to find highly targeted and standards-aligned math resources to support kindergarten through fifth grade instruction.

TeacherAdvisor.org uses IBM’s Watson technology, which has been trained by leading math experts, to provide educators with targeted recommendations from a library of over 2,000 high-quality lesson plans, activities, proven teaching strategies, and videos, all specially chosen to meet teachers’ needs.

Teacher Advisor is a philanthropic initiative from the IBM International Foundation, who collaborated closely with teachers, education leaders, and providers of best-in-class content to develop a robust platform to help reach young learners of all ability levels. Educators seeking to master new skills and / or find supplementary lessons and activities for students at varying skill levels, can use Teacher Advisor to:

• Type in a math concept or topic to quickly find, review, and download recommended resources • Toggle between grade levels to see topic-aligned resources for learners above or below grade-level • View standards alignment for a given lesson or activity (as well as review standard pre- and post-requisites) • Learn about proven-effective teaching strategies and techniques that can help bring lessons to life.

The Teacher Advisor Watson team welcomes any and all feedback, which can be entered in the tool after signing up. You can also view a short teacher-led demo video here. .

"We identified many years ago that STEM talent was critical to our workforce and our client’s workforce,” says Al Bunshaft, senior executive at Dassault Systemes, the parent company of MBAE supporter DS SOLIDWORKS. “Finding the right skilled employees has become increasingly difficult and more competitive in recent years. For this reason we placed STEM education at the top of our corporate social responsibility agenda in the USA over five years ago.”

Dassault Systemes Boosts Student Interest in STEM

In 2015, the company’s Waltham, MA campus hosted a dynamic and engaging hands-on learning program for students from Minuteman Science and Technology High School to connect what these students learn in the classroom to careers, help them discover their interests, and inspire them to pursue a STEM field in college and career.

The program was part of STEM Career Accelerator Day, a national campaign and series of concurrent events designed to engage and expose students, parents and teachers to career-focused experiential learning at corporate sites, government facilities, and higher education institutions.

In one session, executives from DS gave students a virtual tour of a beating human heart to demonstrate how realistic simulation and 3D visualization enables scientists and engineers to better understand their product’s behavior within the human body. In another, a retired U.S. Navy Rear Admiral helped students understand the technical challenges the Navy faces in performing its missions and engaged students in developing solutions. Students and faculty from Olin College of Engineering led another session on the big challenges the next generation will have to solve, from the supply of water, food and energy to cyber security threats, and demonstrated a new type of engineering education being pioneered by Olin in which students start identifying problems and building solutions from the moment they enter their first year in college.

“We participate in many different types of initiatives in an effort to make an impact and improve our nation’s, our region’s, our client’s and our own competitiveness over time" says Bunshaft. STEM Career Accelerator Day is just one example.

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